A journey to Yorkshire’s Land’s End: Walking at Spurn National Nature Reserve

Credit: Spurn lighthouse James Hardisty

Yorkshire’s beautiful landscapes have so much to offer, particularly those off the beaten track – or those at the county’s extreme edges. A walk through these wild places provides invigorating exercise for the heart, body and mind.

Spurn National Nature Reserve (or ‘Spurn Point’, as it’s known to many), is one of these iconic landscapes. It’s a natural wonder and fine example of a longshore drift, straight from a geography textbook, whereby over thousands of years, sand and gravel have been eroded from the coast and moved south by the tides. Today, Spurn is a sandy peninsula jutting out 3.5 miles from the Holderness Coast into the mouth of the Humber Estuary. Cars could once travel all the way down this sandy strip, but after a major storm surge in 2013, this journey can only be made by foot, bike or aboard Yorkshire Wildlife Trust’s Spurn Safari vehicle.  

In this blog post, Yorkshire Wildlife Trust share their top tips for walking at Spurn. Not only is it one of Yorkshire’s most wildlife-rich landscapes (and one of the best places in the UK to see migratory birds), but the peninsula is also steeped in maritime and military history. You can, in fact, climb to the top of the tallest lighthouse in Northern England or explore excavated World War Two tunnels (see our website for opening times). Follow in the footsteps of brave soldiers, lifeboat heroes and wildlife conservationists as you discover this unique and ever-changing place.

Visit here to find out more: https://www.ywt.org.uk/blog/andy-mason/walking-spurns-very-own-lands-end

Why not join us for a 10km guided walk to Spurn Point and back again on Sunday 18th July, 10am – 2pm?

Join our expert guide for an epic journey to Spurn Point and back again! May tales of Spurn’s maritime and military past enlighten your way, as well as some top wildlife spotting tips. You’ll also receive a special certificate to celebrate your achievement!

Please visit our events page here for more information and to book your place!

Yorkshire Wildlife Trust is the only charity entirely dedicated to conserving, protecting and restoring Yorkshire’s wildlife and wild places.

To help protect our wildlife and wild places please:

Follow the latest government guidance on social distancing
Follow any signage on site
Stick to the paths and trails, and check if dogs are welcome or need to be on a lead.
Take your litter home, as it’s harder for us to empty bins regularly.

Count wildlife as you count your steps!

Credit: Mother and daughter walking through park, UK – Ben Hall2020VISION
Here at Yorkshire Wildlife Trust, we’re gearing up for the Great Yorkshire Creature Count (Saturday 19th June – Sunday 20th June 2021).  We’re on a mission to discover how many different wildlife species we can collectively record in 24 hours, and are challenging folk in every corner of Yorkshire to record what they can see from their own doorsteps.

Whether that’s looking and listening out of a window, peering into and under pots and window boxes, exploring the nooks and crannies of a terraced yard, or scouring a leafy garden – we want to know what you see and where you see it!

You can complete your challenge on a local walk too. As you pop to the shop, stretch your legs around the block or take your four-legged friend for a walk, our blog features top tips on how and where to spot as much wildlife as you can from your front door.

Make your next walk count for wildlife as well as your heart, body and mind. Read our blog here: https://www.ywt.org.uk/blog/yorkshire-wildlife-trust/step-out-your-front-door-and-count-creatures-great-and-small

Join in our ‘wild Yorkshire census’ and get counting!

Sign up to the challenge today, receive instructions for taking part and get more creature counting tips here: https://www.ywt.org.uk/great-yorkshire-creature-count

Yorkshire Wildlife Trust is the only charity entirely dedicated to conserving, protecting and restoring Yorkshire’s wildlife and wild places.

To help protect our wildlife and wild places please:

Follow the latest government guidance on social distancing
Follow any signage on site
Stick to the paths and trails, and check if dogs are welcome or need to be on a lead.
Take your litter home, as it’s harder for us to empty bins regularly.