deep dale pic

Bishop Wilton and Deep Dale Circular

This 8-mile circular walk from Bishop Wilton to Deep Dale is a magnificent way to take in the Wolds in the East Riding of Yorkshire. Along with enormous views across the Vale of York, you get to walk within chalk wold dales that are quiet, remote and beautiful.

As you shall see, I did this walk in early December and had the pleasure of many seasons in one day. From an early snowfall to glorious winter sunshine, with autumn colours still abound.

bishop wilton

And to add to all that, the walk begins and ends in the pretty village of Bishop Wilton, not far off the A166. It is a gorgeous village to explore in its own right with a small convenience shop and, right in the middle, the local pub called The Fleece Inn.

Parking spaces are available around and about the village green area near the pub but please be respectful of people’s property and space.

So. What better place is there to start and end this walk but at The Fleece itself?

The Fleece

For your information, I did this walk in a clockwise direction and have put the GPX on the Walkshire Map to help.

OK. Imagine you are coming out of the pub door, head immediately right and go along the lane for a couple of hundred metres. Then head up the last lane on the left before leaving the village. Follow the lane and it will soon turn to path and continue on, following the yellow waymark arrows. You will soon enter a field where you begin your trek uphill.

dogs and tree

That first bit certainly gets the heart and lungs going and we soon warmed up.

Once it levels up you are on Stonetable Hill. Follow the path around the edge of the top beside the field. You get amazing views across the Vale of York as you walk. You can see for miles, especially on a clear day.

view from stonetable hill

As you follow the contour of the valley around the hill it clears ahead with Worsendale Plantation as your next landmark to head to.

on stonetable hill

The path heads to the right of the trees and after a gate you keep the plantation to your left and head straight on to the end of the field where you turn right and uphill again. Not so steep though this time.

bishop wilton wold

The dogs were absolutely loving the walk. Freedom to run and play. It was certainly doing a job of tiring them out happily.

It is up here that you reach Bishop Wilton Wold. Otherwise known as Garrowby Hill. The highest point in the Yorkshire Wolds. Not a mountain but a fine place with fine views and nature that is for sure. The view back over The Vale of York was bigger than ever so far.

views galore

At the end of this field you come to a lane. Cross over and carry on directly opposite along the public footpath.

It is here that you drop down into Deep Dale. A wonderfully secluded and tranquil dale that is full of sights and nature yet completely quiet. I dropped down into and up the other side without seeing another soul.

This is one of those great valleys that you need to walk to to explore, not just park up within.

deep dale

After the early snow showers the sun had not broken above the trees to melt it so we walked from sunshine to a winter scene almost immediately.

You drop down to the heart of the dale and then almost immediately climb up the other side. The path then heads left at the top along a path above the valley.

heading out of deepdale

Eventually you will meet a road. This is the section were you will need to put the leads on the dogs. For now there are two miles of road walking. It is not busy though at all in my experience. Once at the road turn right along it.

lane walk

After a mile or so the lane meets a bigger road at a signposted junction. But all you need to do is keep going straight on and downhill, towards Millington.

millington sign

Don’t just keep your head down and look straight ahead, there is joy to be seen either side of the road. The Vale of York opens up again to your right and views of fields and beyond to your left.

After the snow I got some surreal views.

snow and fields

After a mile from the junction there is a gate off to your right where the path takes you down and down.

Again, the variety of views on offer just keep on coming at every turn.

wolds view

The path ahead is off through those trees in the pic above. From open fields to a woodland walk. Nice indeed!

This tree-lined Dale is a magical place to walk through.

dog in woods

Towards the end of this dale and woods you will see appearing the gorgeous little Church of St. Ethelburga.

Church of St. Ethelburga

This landmark tells you that you are arriving at Great Givendale, a beautiful little hamlet. From the church, cross the road directly and along the lane that goes through the hamlet itself.

After the houses you will see a path heading right along a track and you take this route.

Before long the track heads right again through a gate and along a narrow path that traverses the contours of the hill with open views to your left.

dog on wolds

Keep following the yellow arrows and before long you start heading down and down, with Bishop Wilton unmistakeably ahead.

Once back down to the road, turn right and you will head straight back to the The Fleece Inn.

I have to say that if you want to do one walk that has every variety that the Yorkshire Wolds has to offer, then start with this one. No matter the weather, it will be a most memorable 8 miles well spent!

allerthorpe woods dog walk

Allerthorpe Common and Waplington

This 5-mile circular walk around Allerthorpe Common and Waplington is situated near Pocklington, East Riding of Yorkshire. Allerthorpe Common and Woods are perfect for a dog walk! My dogs loved it and I know your dogs will too.

The pine woodland of Allerthorpe is very attractive to walk through, no matter what season, as the tracks are wide and easy to follow.

At exactly the half way point in Allerthorpe, you have the chance for refreshment or lunch at the very dog-friendly Plough Inn.

dog in the woods

The best place to start is the Forestry Commission car park on Common Lane on the west side of the woods.

If driving east from York on the A1079, before you get to Pocklington turn right onto Sutton Lane. After about a mile, turn left onto Common Lane. The car park will be on the right hand side after half a mile.

To start the walk, cross the road from the car park and through the gate into the common. Here you have 2 paths – to follow my route, take the left fork.

allerthorpe common path

Then just simply keep going straight on through the majestic pine woodland. The path is wide and clear, and yes thre is plenty of safe nature for the dogs to run, wander and play within.

The tree-lined surrounds change to keep variety as you walk. See high pines and colourful natural woodland. It is a joy for us as well as our pawed friends.

allerthorpe woodland

The wide path leads to a narrower woodland path and you walk within the deeper greenery for a mile or so, When you come out of the other side you walk along the track with a huge open green field on your right and this takes you into the small village of Allerthorpe, the halfway point and comes out right at the Plough Inn.

Plough Inn

The welcome at the pub is wonderful. No matter the weather it will feel cosy from snug, warm and comfortable within or in the sunshine outside.

The owners and staff are extremely dog friendly with Malc and Pete getting ever so fussed over.

inside the plough inn

Refreshed, it was time to get back into the fresh air and complete the second half of the walk. Head straight out ahead from the front door of the pub and continue down the road just a few hundred metres to the edge of the village.

Then you will take a right turn away from the road and onto a track. Along here you will feel the mix of urban and woodland. Quaint houses dotted here and there with manicured gardens set amongst the nature they are within. This is Waplington.

allerthorpe track

On the way back you are out of the thicker woodland and into more fielded open areas. The track is clear, wide and continuous so no worries about getting lost.

Eventually you will come to Warren Farm where you turn right and then left around the edge of the crop fields.

farm track

For me the colours of nature were so autumnal and had that wonderful natural orange vibe in the sunshine. But in the greens of summer or black and whites of winter, this is a fabulous walk to wander.

At the end of the fields you will see a gate straight ahead that takes you back into the woods and the path heads left after the gate, within the natural woodland and back to the car park you started at.

dog in woods

If you like flat walks full of a variety of nature then this is definitely a gem for you. Your dogs will love it too!

2 dogs in the woods

It makes for a super family walk too. A great 5 miles well spent in the East Riding of Yorkshire.

Haworth to Hebden Bridge

Today’s walk of the day is a eight mile linear route from the historic Haworth to the ‘hip’ Hebden Bridge.

Your start point is at the Brontë Parsonage Museum in Haworth. Haworth is notable for its association with the Brontë family. Charlotte, Emily and Anne wrote some of the most noteworthy novels of the Victorian Era including Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights and The Tenant of Wildfell Hall.

Haworth to Hebden Bridge – Route

Start from the car park at the Parsonage Museum and head down the steps towards West Lane. Take a right turn down the hill until you reach a church. Take a path to the right towards Penistone Hill. Follow this until you reach a fork in the path with two options: Haworth Old Road or Pennine Way.

We recommend that you take the Haworth Old road route as it is shorter (six miles) compared to the Pennine Way (ten miles). If you’re feeling extra active, combine these walks to make a circuit at around sixteen miles in length.

The route along the Haworth Old Road is relatively straightforward and signposted towards Hebden Bridge. It will take you over moorland that was inspirational to the Brontë sisters.

At the end of your walk you will arrive in Hebden Bridge. Take a break in the artsy town for a refreshment at the end of your walk – Stubbing Wharf could be the perfect place for a nice cool pint.

Haworth to Hebden Bridge – Conditions

Unfortunately this walk is not suitable for pushchairs or wheelchairs due to the hilly paths.

Useful Links

For travelling to Haworth by public transport visit Transdev.

For more Walkshire Walks of the Day follow this link or read more of our Walkshire blogs here.

Find out more about the route here.

Woodhouse Ridge Circular

Today’s walk of the day takes you along Woodhouse Ridge on the outskirts of Leeds in an easy two-mile circuit. This secluded walk takes you behind Headingley and is perfect for getting a quick break from the busy student area.

To start the walk, head through the entrance on Ridge Terrace and keep the stone wall on your right hand side as you go uphill.

The entrance on Ridge Terrace

The view from the top of Cardboard Hill is a lovely view of Meanwood. There are benches to take in the view and an information board to learn a little bit about the history and wildlife in the area. The hill is a great place to sit and take in nature, particularly in spring and summer, when it’s a picnic hot-spot.

The view from the top of Cardboard Hill

Woodhouse Ridge Route

Make your way along the ridge you will encounter wildlife that you wouldn’t expect to find so close to the city.

Making your way up the ridge with the wall on your right will lead you past an onion patch and large oak trees from which you can often hear birdsong.

Go along this path until you start heading back downhill and reach the back to back terraced houses. At this point, you should turn around and take the path on your right back down the hill. This will lead you past the remnants of a bandstand from the Edwardian era. Continue past this through Batty’s Wood until you find yourself on Cardboard Hill once again.

Woodhouse Ridge – Conditions

This walk is a perfect stroll and the paths are generally easy to walk on. It can be very muddy if there has been rainfall which can make some of the hills much more difficult so be mindful of the weather.

Woodhouse Ridge in the Snow

Having walked the Woodhouse Ridge in the snow, I would personally not recommend it because the hills can be very slippery and difficult to navigate. While the views were lovely, it was very difficult to avoid slipping.

Useful Links

Find out more about the Ridge here.

Discover more Walkshire routes here.

Goitstock Waterfall Walk

Goitstock Waterfall in the sunlight

Goitstock Waterfall is an exciting visit and an underappreciated location in the West Yorkshire countryside. It is close to Bingley and often praised as a hidden gem.

A two mile stroll through the Goitstock Woods will lead you along the Harden Beck to the spectacular waterfall.

Start at The Malt pub in Harden and walk away from Bingley towards Cullingworth. For the best route, follow the signs for the Goitstock & Senior Way. Along the route, you will pass three mills: Hallas Bridge, Harden Bridge and Goit Stock.

Goitstock Waterfall in the snow

The terrain of the walk is relatively level. While it is rainy, the flat dirt paths may be difficult to navigate so it is best to wear your walking boots.

The walk is suitable for children and they will be in awe of the waterfall. However, be especially careful around the beck as the currents are dangerous.

The walk is circular and you will return to the Malt pub which is dog friendly and the perfect place to enjoy a post walk refreshment.

For more Walkshire Walks of the Day follow this link.

The Harland Way: Wetherby to Spofforth Railway Walk

There are so many dog walks on the Harland Way. These are my favourite kinds of walk as they have lots of hills to go up and throw my ball down!

For this one, you park in the old Wetherby Railway Station Car Park – on the Linton side of Wetherby. The path leads directly from here towards Spofforth.

Spot my ball?

This path is wide and good for walkers, kids, dogs and cyclists. There is a variety of routes to take and many crossroads to turn different ways!

Ball is life!

The paths are well sign posted and have railway bridges crossing over the top. As it opens up towards Spofforth you’ll get a glimpse of Spoffoth Castle.

Try the Castle Pub in Spofforth for a dog friendly pub for lunch, if you fancy turning this three mile walk into a six mile circuit, you can loop back and try Kofi and Co in Wetherby – they have the best brunch around and a great selection of smoothies.

Read more about Merlin on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/merlinthechocolatewizard/

river ouse and dog

A Walk Around Clifton and Rawcliffe Ings, York

A wonderful walk just to the north of the City of York which takes in a wander beside the River Ouse together with the wide open green spaces of Clifton Ings and Rawcliffe Ings. Perfect for dogs, nature lovers and families alike.

clifton ings

The walk around the circumference of both Rawcliffe and Clifton Ings is only 3.5 miles, so achievable to many. There are many detours that can help create a much longer walk if you wish. Keep heading north along the cycle path toward Skelton or just a mile or two south you can be in the City of York itself.

Parking

The big Park and Ride car park, Rawcliffe Bar, is free and is predominantly used for people heading into York and back. However, the beauty of it is that it is situated right beside the Ings and the River Ouse too.

Behind the bus stop within the car park, look for the path that leads away within the trees and down to the open space.

dog walk york

Rawcliffe Ings

I did this walk anti-clockwise so you get much of the river in the first half. Upon reaching the cycle path from the car park, turn right, and head under the road bridge that carries the A1237 York Ring Road above.

Here you are within Rawcliffe Ings, and soon you will meet the riverside. Once at the river turn left and follow it heading South. This will lead naturally into Clifton Ings.

Clifton Ings

It is a joy to walk along the river here. To your left is a wide open green field for the dogs to run and run. To your right the river is a pleasure to walk beside.

running dogs

The main path is raised on a flood defence so the elevation gives a perspective all over as you walk.

Every now and then you get sandy beach-like areas that children or dogs will love, whatever the weather.

tree and dog

As you walk along the riverside, the raised path it will eventually leave the water’s edge and bend left, back toward the concrete path and cycle path.

Here is where you can turn right and head into the city or turn left to continue back beside Clifton Ings.

Now the open field is to your left and there are well maintained meadows and nature reserves along the way to your right.

Keep following the path back to the car park you started at, but make sure you enjoy every step and view along the way. Also keep an eye out for the well maintained and kept meadows, full of colour and butterflies galore.

I have placed the GPX route of my walk on the Yorkshire.com map.

Visiting the scarecrow trail in Boston Spa

Merlin’s favourite outside the vets on the high street – he’s looking for a lady…..

This annual event is part of Boston Spa’s village festival. Although it was one of the only elements to go ahead this year due to Covid, the trail is still amazing, featuring superheroes and Disney characters executed very well.

There are around 100 scarecrows across Boston Spa, Clifford and Thorp Arch, so it might be best to choose one area per day! Track them down with a map from Doug Yeadon’s or Costcutter in the village.

boston spa scarecrow
Merlin loved Nemo and even managed to topple the jewels with his excitement!

Walking through the village, you can stop for an ice cream sundae at the lovely Hart’s, enjoy a beer outside the Stew or even have a wander down by the river. There was some great live music on the square, as well as a few street food stands for tapas and Indian treats.

scarecrow dog walk
‘I loved a sniff of Olaf although he tickled my nose…!’

You get to discover many hidden corners of the villages and admire all the handiwork, though watch out for a fright or two!

I barked at this scary lady….frightening!

It was all a bit hot and sticky after a while, so I took shelter in a bush to hide from the sun and the scary scarecrows!

All in all, this is definitely a great day out! The Boston Spa Festival usually takes place in mid-July.

Walking by the river in Appletreewick

Staying at Mason’s campsite is one of the highlights of our year. Due to Covid last year, this is also Merlin’s first visit! The joy of camping so close to the river, but with great facilities, makes it one of the best sites in the UK.

Setting off on foot from Mason’s campsite, we saw gorgeous woods and river views instantly; you’ll find lots of stone skimming and paddling opportunities there as well.

Walking towards How Gill Farm, we headed through some farmer’s fields which had every different type of stile going. Merlin had lots of fun tackling each one!

Bending round to be greeted by an open expanse and views up to Simon’s Seat, we found that the climb got a bit steeper here. We then veered off up a farm lane to hunt down Brownies.

This was a real find – it offers a gorgeous setting and views, great brownies and coffee too.

We then headed into the woods again and to the stepping stones which are well worth a visit.

Walking the stepping stones having swum them twice already and nearly taken out my Daddy!

We then had lunch in the nearby field, with Merlin fetching the ball on a loop and getting in on a family portrait too!

Heading back to the trail, we curved back round the farm and onto a little road to return to the campsite. We paused at the Craven Arms pub beer garden for a swift refreshment, of course.

The big swim – Swinsty and Fewston Reservoirs walk 

The joy of a ball in a reservoir – no chasing it with the current!

Coming into the Swinsty Reservoir car park, you’re immediately into this glorious view – a sandy beach area and the start of the circular walk. We usually go all the way around this reservoir but work is going on at the moment, so we did half of it and then continued all the way around Fewston.

These walks are the woods and water family heaven type. They feature loads of den building opportunities, logs to walk along, tree stumps to leap off and bridges to cross. There are lots of benches dotted along the route and plenty of dog swimming opportunities – for Merlin that is!

Picnic spots are plentiful and the blue sky and tall trees reflecting in the water make for an amazing backdrop.

Daddy i wanna get on!!

The large bridge crossing Swinsty gives you a great view of the scale of the reservoir.

You can see the walk mapped out below- it’s also really well signposted and easy to follow. Dogs can be off lead almost all of the walk, with just an occasional road to cross.

You can put Swinsty Reservoir HG3 1SU in the sat nav and park in the main car park.

The treat at the end of the walk was a glorious ice cream from the Dales Van – sat by the side of the reservoir obviously!

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